Institute Fellows

Richard Chenhall
Richard Chenhall

Richard Chenhall

Institute Fellow (Digital Anthropology)

Richard is the Institute's Digital Anthropology Fellow. Digital Anthropology examines how the technology and tools of the networked society effect the connections between people, places and things. Digital Anthropology research increases our understanding of the human interactions to inform the development of new and emerging services and ideas.


Bjorn Nansen
Bjorn Nansen

Bjorn Nansen

Institute Fellow (Digital Media)

Bjorn Nansen is a lecturer in Media and Communications at the University of Melbourne. He researches digital media and communications technologies, computer interaction and network culture utilizing a mix of ethnographic, participatory and digital methods. His research interests include technology adoption, home media environments, young children's digital media use, and post-digital interfaces. He currently holds an Australian Research Council funded Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA), to study young children's use of mobile and interactive media. unimelb.academia.edu/bjornnansen


Victoria Palmer
Victoria Palmer

Victoria Palmer

Institute Fellow (Applied Ethics)

Dr Palmer is a trained applied ethicist, qualitative researcher and the Deputy Lead of the mental health research program in the Department of General Practice at The University of Melbourne.  She has worked across the disability, domestic violence and mental health sectors for over ten years. In 2007 she completed a PhD thesis which examined moral and ethical community formation.  From 2007-2010 she participated in a large study of the organisation of primary care for depression, and lead two studies exploring social prescriptions for depression, anxiety and co-morbid physical health and the philosophy of generalism for primary care.  She recently completed an exploratory study of photo elicitation to explore cultural representations of living with depression for Vietnamese women.  Victoria is the principal investigator of a four year stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial of an experience based co-design method in the community mental health setting for people living with severe mental illness in the Victoria, Australia.  Her work across participatory action research methods like co-design and developing ethical frameworks for vulnerable groups in research makes her a critical contributor to exploring the ethics of the 'networked living research theme improving healthcare through participatory, personalised and preventative medicine'.   Victoria's research will explore the ethical issues brought about by participatory, personalised, preventive and predictive medicine (P4 Medicine).  The networked society will have a substantive impact on vulnerable populations such as people living with severe mental illness and their carers.  Dr Palmer will examine the ethical implications raised by P4 medicine and the impact on vulnerable groups and to work toward the development of networked ethical responsiveness.


Laura Tarzia
Laura Tarzia

Laura Tarzia

Institute Fellow (Domestic Violence)

Laura is a sociologist and Deputy Lead of the Researching Abuse and Violence program within the Department of General Practice, as well as a member of the steering committee for the Melbourne research Alliance to End Violence against women and their children (MAEVe), a new inter-disciplinary initiative across the University of Melbourne. Her research currently focuses on early intervention and response to domestic and sexual violence against women. In particular, her work over the past two years has explored the ways that technology such as the internet and smartphones can be harnessed to deliver interventions for women experiencing violence.

Laura currently coordinates a national ARC-funded randomised controlled trial of an online healthy relationship tool and safety decision aid (I-DECIDE) for women experiencing domestic violence. She is also an investigator on the PEARL project, which is currently exploring whether there is a role for technological interventions to promote awareness and help-seeking in men who use violence in relationships. She has recently been collaborating with MNSI in the development of the Not The Only One website, which is an online database of survivor stories from women who have experienced violence at the hands of a current or ex-partner. Not The Only One aims to create a safe, online space where women can share experiences and stories that they would not be comfortable disclosing in person.